Location

Northwestern College, Rowenhorst Student Center

Description

Context: Janda’s Upper-Crossed Syndrome (UCS) is characterized by alternating patterns of tightness and weakness, which is indicative of muscle imbalances and movement dysfunction usually seen in unilateral athletes. These muscle imbalances can cause abnormal movement patterns and sometimes manifest as pain. Anecdotal evidence seen in the athletic training clinic also supported the use of non-dominant side movement patterns to improve dominant side functioning and decrease pain. Objective: Based on the UCS, application of non-dominant shoulder exercises may decrease muscle imbalances and movement dysfunction. We hypothesized that there would be an increase in internal rotation of the dominant shoulder demonstrating increased movement pattern function. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Small Midwest NAIA athletic training clinic. Participants: Women collegiate volleyball players (22) with the age range of 18-21. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned into two groups, a treatment and control group. The treatment group performed 15 overhand serves with their non-dominant arm three times a week for four weeks. Baseline, midpoint, and final measurements were taken. Main Outcome Measures: External and internal rotation of the dominant and non-dominant shoulder were taken using a clinometer app on a clinician’s smartphone. Results: Results were calculated using repeated measures ANOVA. With a large effect size (0.87 and 1.19), significant increase was found in external rotation ROM in the non-dominant shoulder from baseline to mid-point measurement (mean difference=10°), and from baseline to final measurement (mean differences=14°). Conclusions: Based on the differences in range of motion of the dominant and non-dominant shoulder, we speculate that muscle imbalances were present between shoulders. Non-dominant shoulder exercises significantly increased external rotation of non-dominant shoulder, therefore equalizing the muscular imbalance.

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Apr 12th, 11:00 AM Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

The Effect of Non-Dominant Shoulder Exercises on Non-Dominant and Dominant Shoulder Range of Motion in Collegiate Volleyball Players

Northwestern College, Rowenhorst Student Center

Context: Janda’s Upper-Crossed Syndrome (UCS) is characterized by alternating patterns of tightness and weakness, which is indicative of muscle imbalances and movement dysfunction usually seen in unilateral athletes. These muscle imbalances can cause abnormal movement patterns and sometimes manifest as pain. Anecdotal evidence seen in the athletic training clinic also supported the use of non-dominant side movement patterns to improve dominant side functioning and decrease pain. Objective: Based on the UCS, application of non-dominant shoulder exercises may decrease muscle imbalances and movement dysfunction. We hypothesized that there would be an increase in internal rotation of the dominant shoulder demonstrating increased movement pattern function. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Small Midwest NAIA athletic training clinic. Participants: Women collegiate volleyball players (22) with the age range of 18-21. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned into two groups, a treatment and control group. The treatment group performed 15 overhand serves with their non-dominant arm three times a week for four weeks. Baseline, midpoint, and final measurements were taken. Main Outcome Measures: External and internal rotation of the dominant and non-dominant shoulder were taken using a clinometer app on a clinician’s smartphone. Results: Results were calculated using repeated measures ANOVA. With a large effect size (0.87 and 1.19), significant increase was found in external rotation ROM in the non-dominant shoulder from baseline to mid-point measurement (mean difference=10°), and from baseline to final measurement (mean differences=14°). Conclusions: Based on the differences in range of motion of the dominant and non-dominant shoulder, we speculate that muscle imbalances were present between shoulders. Non-dominant shoulder exercises significantly increased external rotation of non-dominant shoulder, therefore equalizing the muscular imbalance.

 

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