Location

Northwestern College, Rowenhorst Student Center

Description

We provide a summary report of a survey on student attitudes toward kneeling during the national anthems prior to NFL games and other athletic events. The study consists of a representative sample of 268 NWC students. The data were collected through a randomized email distribution and computer-assisted interviews during the fall of 2017. Our findings suggest that although NWC students generally recognize systematic disadvantages against people of color in the United States, they have reservations about whether kneeling is an appropriate or effective form of protest; nearly two thirds indicated that kneeling was disrespectful to the country. We also examine whether and how these attitudes are influenced by three other factors: political attitudes, gender, and religiosity. Conservative political attitudes and approval of Donald Trump’s presidential were both significantly associated with students’ negative attitudes toward kneeling. Women were more likely to approve of kneeling than men, and the effect of gender was partially mediated by political attitudes. The importance of religion was generally associated with stronger disapproval of kneeling during national anthems, but there is some evidence that religious salience has mixed effects on whether students believed kneeling was appropriate, effective, or disrespectful to country. We discuss how these findings reflect and may contribute to a national conversation about the meaning of kneeling in the context of American race relations, patriotism, and religious commitment.

Included in

Sociology Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 11:00 AM

NWC Attitudes toward Kneeling and the National Anthem

Northwestern College, Rowenhorst Student Center

We provide a summary report of a survey on student attitudes toward kneeling during the national anthems prior to NFL games and other athletic events. The study consists of a representative sample of 268 NWC students. The data were collected through a randomized email distribution and computer-assisted interviews during the fall of 2017. Our findings suggest that although NWC students generally recognize systematic disadvantages against people of color in the United States, they have reservations about whether kneeling is an appropriate or effective form of protest; nearly two thirds indicated that kneeling was disrespectful to the country. We also examine whether and how these attitudes are influenced by three other factors: political attitudes, gender, and religiosity. Conservative political attitudes and approval of Donald Trump’s presidential were both significantly associated with students’ negative attitudes toward kneeling. Women were more likely to approve of kneeling than men, and the effect of gender was partially mediated by political attitudes. The importance of religion was generally associated with stronger disapproval of kneeling during national anthems, but there is some evidence that religious salience has mixed effects on whether students believed kneeling was appropriate, effective, or disrespectful to country. We discuss how these findings reflect and may contribute to a national conversation about the meaning of kneeling in the context of American race relations, patriotism, and religious commitment.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.